Elderberry Syrup, DIY

Elderberry Syrup, DIY

Submitted by servantheart, Editor-At-Large

 

 

 

½ cup elderberries, dried

1 cinnamon stick

5 cloves

1 TBSP freshly grated ginger

2 cups clean water

1 cup RAW, unfiltered honey

 

Put all in a saucepan EXCEPT honey. Bring to a boil, then turn it down to simmer. Simmer,

covered, until liquid reduces by one-half (about 20-30 minutes). Strain liquid into a glass

bowl. Squish all the good juice out of berries through sieve/strainer, however. Gently whisk in

your honey. Store in a closed glass jar in the refrigerator for up to two weeks. You can make

this with fresh or frozen berries, but use a full cup of berries, rather than the half cup dried.

 

This only keeps for a couple of weeks, so make a small batch at a time from your stored

ingredients.

 

Source: Mountain Rose Herbs: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XOYzWyFGkqM 

Check out: HerbMentor.com

 

Used for its antioxidant activity, to lower cholesterol, improve vision, boost the immune

system, improve heart health and for coughs, colds, flu, bacterial and viral infections and

tonsilitis. Elderberry juice was used to treat a flu epidemic in Panama in 1995.

 

Elderberries have been a folk remedy for centuries in North America, Europe, Western

Asia, and North Africa, hence the medicinal benefits of elderberries are being investigated

and rediscovered. Elderberry is used for its antioxidant activity, to lower cholesterol, to

improve vision, to boost the immune system, to improve heart health and for coughs,

colds, flu, bacterial and viral infections and tonsilitis. Bioflavonoids and other proteins in the

juice destroy the ability of cold and flu viruses to infect a cell. People with the flu who took

elderberry juice reported less severe symptoms and felt better much faster than those who

did not. Elderberry juice was used to treat a flu epidemic in Panama in 1951

 

Elderberries contain organic pigments, tannin, amino acids, carotenoids, flavonoids, sugar,

rutin, viburnic acid, vitamin A and B and a large amount of vitamin C. They are also mildly

laxative, a diuretic, and diaphoretic. Flavonoids, including quercetin, are believed to account

for the therapeutic actions of the elderberry flowers and berries. According to test tube

studies2 these flavonoids include anthocyanins that are powerful antioxidants and protect

cells against damage.

 

http://www.herbwisdom.com/herb-elderberry.html

© 2013, Seasoned Citizen Prepper. All rights reserved. On republishing this post you must provide link to original post.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Dislike(0)