Cement/Old Iron/Wood Coating Product

By Beverly Sandlin

Home maintenance is part of being frugal and keeping what you have protected. I’m sharing this because I have never seen or heard of anyone else doing this, and it works! Having worked for Sherwin-Williams Paint Stores for years, I am naturally using a product I know – Deckscapes Semi-Transparent Exterior Stain in Cedar Tone – water based. True Value has a similar stain and I’m sure that others do as well.

The most universal application of this stain is wood decking, but you can also use it on any wood surface. FYI, I use it in interior applications to do a one step stain and finish like on interior tongue and groove planking and unfinished wood cupboards. It is very cleanable and the worst case scenario is that I have to put on another coat. It does not peel! It weathers away and that is about all, so freshening up is not a big deal. Here is a before and after of an old school desk and fence panel – I also like that it gives graying wood a wonderful new tone. Tap pictures to make larger if desired.

Before

Before

 

After

After

 

A very unique application is on cement – I have yet to put it on a horizontal cement surface, but probably will later this summer. I like rock – did you guess that with bcfossillady as an email? And I like cement ornamental elements in my gardens. I have never had any success in painting cement (Yes, I know about priming!) that didn’t start to peel in 5 years. Here is a before and after of a cement lynx that I coated 4 years ago and now again this summer:

Before - note toes at bottom.

Before – note toes at bottom.

 

After

After

 

The lighting is different on these pictures, but the only big difference is that the toes on the hind feet had worn away. And I never bring in the statues or cover them over a Minnesota winter. Some more pictures to give you a better idea of what happens with this product.

unfinished on bench

 

bench finished Note how shiny the mare and colt are?

Yes, I coated them!

kids

 

Note beading of rain water.

Note beading of rain water.

 

swing finished

And yes you can use it on seating! That said, I also use it on old iron. Some people are finicky and don’t want to sit on a rusted iron bench because they might get rust on their jeans. This coating product will leave the look there but will protect the iron from the weather and also seal the rust so that it will not transfer to clothing.

Note water beading on the coated iron and not beading on the uncoated iron.

Note water beading on the coated iron and not beading on the uncoated iron.

 

I’ve been using this product in these applications for at least 10 years if not more, so I’m fairly confident about results. I use brush on cement and rollers on fences, but you can also spray it. Note: Start from the top down. Immediately spread any drips. Every piece of cement will take the stain differently depending on how finished the surface is – which I like because it makes them all unique.

I should mention that this also works on old traps, old iron farm implements, horns and walking sticks. This is a walking stick I just finished with the stain on both the diamond willow stick and the horn, but not the fossils – works on rock too.  :)  The hammered copper was a new experience for me – just copper stripped from old wire.

staff.horn 004

One or two coats every 5-10 years with no priming or sanding.

Just a way to make your life easier!

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